Chronology of Events for October 1755

October 1755: The French inhabitants of Acadia are exiled by the English. Some return to France and others move to Louisiana.

October, 1755: “And from Berlin we are told, that according to some private letters from the North, the Czarina hath declared to the British minister, that if the 73,450 men which she hath bound herself by treaty to furnish to Great-Britain should be insufficient, she will add 20 or 30,000 more. The subsidy stipulated is 60,000l. a year, whilst they are not employed, and 560,000l. when they are in service. [The yearly charge of 18,857 British troops, is 618,315l. 7s. 11d.”]

October 1, 1755: “Vienna, Oct. 1. According to all appearances the court is more solicitous for the establishing her troops on a good footing in Italy, than anxious for the safety of the Netherlands; the troops designed to march to the Low Countries being barely nominated, while all possible means of dispatch are made to compleat those intended for Lombardy, not only in regard to their number, but also in their discipline, stores, and every requisite for a speedy campaign. The number of horses required for the use of the cavalry, are already bought up, and most os them delivered; upwards of 2000 being assembled in Bohemia and Moravia, and 900 more daily expected from Lunenburg.”

October 9, 1755: “Philadelphia, Oct. 9. By a vessel from North Carolina we have advice, that the Cherokee tribe of Indians, encouraged by a large bounty for every scalp of the enemy, granted by the province of South Carolina, had, to the number of 1600, engaged to march against the French, and the Indians in their interest, on the Ohio; and that, as a farther encouragement towards the expedition, the government of North Carolina had made a present to them of 300 steers.”

October 14, 1755: “Admiral Byng sailed from Spithead, with eight ships of the line, and some frigates, and was joined at Plymouth by four other ships of the line.”

October 16, 1755: The prince of Morocco made himself master of the two towns of Sallee, and laid a sum of 70,000 ducats on the inhabitants, and 10,000 ducats on each Christian merchant’s house; bastinadoed Mr. Mountney to death, and also made a sacrifice of consul Pettigrew. Commodore Edgecumbe, with two men of war, sailed from Gibraltar to that place to demand satisfaction.

October 18, 1755: “Philadelphia, Oct. 18. Our expedition against Crown-Point, and on the Lakes, are both laid aside for this fall and winter. We are in a most sad situation in this and our neighbouring province to the southward, having daily accounts of the most barbarous and cruel murders committed on the back inhabitants by the French and their Indians. Last week forty-two persons were found murdered and scalped, at a little blockhouse to which they had retired for safety, within six miles of Fort Cumberland ; and since that, another family, at a little greater distance from the fort, have shared the same fate, being a man, his wife, and nine children, most inhumanly murdered and scalped. Col. Dunbar, with his and Halkett’s regiments, have passed by this place in their way to Albany. All the French in this province have been seized and disarmed, by order of the government.”

October 22, 1755: “The Cherokee tribe of Indians, encouraged by a large bounty for every scalp of the enemy, granted by the province of South Carolina, to the number of 1600, marched against the French, and the Indians in their interest, on the Ohio; and, as a farther encouragement towards the expedition, the government of North Carolina made a present to them of 300 steers.”

October 23, 1755: “The court martial at Portsmouth, on lord Harry Poulett, captain of the Barfleur, for leaving his station without leave of admiral Hawke, was finished; when his lordship was censured, and admonished by the court; but acquitted as to anything capital.”

October 25, 1755: “The dockmen at Portsmouth are ordered to be disciplined and formed into a regiment, as they were in the late war.  The commissioner is colonel, the builder lieutenant colonel, the clerk of the cheque major, and the rest of the officers captains, lieutenants, etc.”

October 25, 1755: “His majesty has directed, that all the reduced officers of the land forces and marines, on half pay, do, on pain of being left out of the next establishment, transmit to the war-office, their age;  the places of their nativity; the dates and ranks of the several commissions they have had in the army; the quality and corps, with the time when they were placed upon half-pay ; and whether they came on by reduction or purchase, and from whom, or by exchange with whom, and from what corps. His majesty has also directed, that all out-pensioners belonging to Chelsea-hospital (the lettermen, men at nine-pence a day, and such who have made their personal appearance at Chelsea, in pursuance of the late advertisements for that purpose excepted) residing in England and Wales, do, on pain of being struck off the books, personally appear in order to undergo an examination between the 10th and 25th of November, next, before such officers as are nominated, in the several parts of the kingdom, in the London-Gazette. And the outpensioners residing in Scotland and Ireland, are to appear at such times and places, as the lord lieutenant of Ireland, and Lieut, Gen. Bland, shall respectively appoint.”

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