Chronology of Events for November 1755

November 11, 1755: The admirals Boscawen, Mostyn, and Holbourne, arrived at Spithead with sixteen men of war from Nova Scotia as also the Lys man of war taken from the French by four men of war under commodore Spry were left at Halifax, and the Alcide, the other French prize.

November 11, 1755: This day the right honourable Henry Fox was appointed one of his Majesty’ principle secretaries of state on the resignation of Sir Thomas Robinson.

November 14, 1755: “The Esperance, a French man of war seventy guns was taken by the Orford captain Stevens, after an engagement. She had but 300 men on board and was going from Rochfort to Brest to be completely manned.”

November 14, 1755: “An augmentation of one Serjeant, one corporal, and seventeen private men, was ordered to each company, in every regiment of foot in Great Britain, and eight men to each troop of the blues commanded by Sir John Ligonier. Artillery was also draughted off to the several regiments in country quarters, and the officers of the ordnance were promised a reward for the discovery of concealed fire arms.”

November 14, 1755: “Captain Rouse, in a twenty gun ship, brought to St. John’s three French vessels lain with fish which he took on the coast of Newfoundland.”

November 14, 1755: A squadron, under the command of Admiral the Hon. John Byng, cruising in the Channel, fell in with, and took, the French 74-gun ship Esperance; but bad weather coming on, and the ship being greatly damaged, the prize was set on fire and destroyed.  She had but 300 men on board and was going from Rochfort to Brest to be completely manned.

November 15, 1755: “A court of aldermen was held a Guildhall, when an order from the secretary of war, for the militia of this city to hold themselves in readiness to march, was read on which a court of lieutenancy was immediately summoned to put the order in execution.”

November 20, 1755: “Orders were given by the court of lieutenancy of this city, for the six regiments of militia to be exercised in the Artillery Ground, by four companies each day.”

November 22, 1755: Vice admiral Byng with part of his squadron, arrived at Spithead from a cruize.

November 22, 1755: Sir George Lyttleton, bart. was appointed one of the commissioners of the treasury, chancellor and under treasurer of his Majesty’s Exchequer, in the room of the right honourable Henry Legge, Lord viscount Barrington secretary war, in the room of the right honourable Henry Fox.

November 25, 1755: “A motion being made in a court of common council, to petition the parliament for a national militia; upon a division, it was carried in the negative.”

November 26, 1755: “An augmentation of one serjeant, one corporal, and 17 private men, is ordered to each company, in every regiment of foot in Great-Britain, and eight men to each troop of the blues, commanded by Sir John Ligonier. Artillery has been draughted off to the several regiments in country quarters, and the officers of the ordnance have promised a reward for the discovery of concealed fire arms.”

November 28, 1755: “Philadelphia, Nov. 28. For some time past the uneasiness of the back-settlers has been much increased by the incursions of the Indians (some of them lately in our interest) who have destroyed many families within about sixty miles of our city. These hostilities having been frequently repeated occasioned a great number of the inhabitants of the back countries to come to town, to promote a reconciliation, run the governor and assembly, which some think is in great measure effected, for since that incident two hills have been passed, one for regulating such as are willing to fight, and the other for raising 55,000l. by a tax upon the estates of the inhabitants; the proprietors only excepted at this time, in consideration of a gift of 55,000l. now given as an addition to the 55,000. The “several governors on the continent are to meet the second of next month at New-York, to settle the plan of operations for next spring. Two days ago the Indians fell upon the Moravian, and destroyed their settlement at Gnaden-Hutten, about eighty five miles from this city, it was remarkable, that, a few days before, the Indians sent down to tell these people to get out of their way, for that they were just coming to take Gnaden-Hutten, which was formerly their own, long before the Europeans set a foot there; nay, at long as the rivers had ran, or the trees burst forth into verdure. The Moravians trusted, they said, in the lamb, who would fight for them; but, alas they have reason to see, that with due confidence in God, proper means must be used if we would be safe.”

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