Category Archives: This Week in 1754

2D Week of September, 1754, from the London Magazine

September 1754

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http://www.hf.rim.or.jp/~kaji/cal/cal.cgi?1754

2D Week of September, 1754, from the London Magazine

Sept. 12 Charles Flemming was tried at the Old-Bailey for robbing Mrs. Hughes, of Ealing, in her chariot. The chief evidence of the identity of his person was a black servant, who not having been baptized, the court refused to take his oath, and the prisoner was acquitted.

Saturday, 14.

The sessions ended at the Old Bailey, when the five following criminals received sentence of death, via;. James Young, for stealing upwards of 40I. in a dwelling house ; John Haines, for robbing a lady of eight guineas on Hounslow- heath; Robert Hoggard, an out-lawed smuggler ; Edward Brocket, for stealing two horses from Mr. Bell, a farmer, near Hatfield ; and ‘William Hambleton, for returning from transportation.

Marriages and Births

  1. Probert Morgan, of Horst, in Gloucestershire, Esq; to Miss Oliver, of Enfield.

12. Robert Baker, of Twickenham, Esq; to Mrs. Owen, of the fame place.

15 Robert Randoll, of Whitthall, Esq; to Miss Lane, of Charles-street, St. James’s Square.

  1. The lady of the Rt. Hon. — Bertie, Esq; of a daughter.

11. The lady of William Harvey, Esq; knight of the shire for Essex, of a son.

12. Lady Monson, of a daughter.

The lady of Matthew Ridley, Esq; member for Newcastle upon Tine, of a son.

Deaths

10. Justinian Champneys, Esq; of Westenhanger, in Kent.

12. Thomas Green, Esq; at his seat at Crondall, in Hampshire, formerly a soap-boiler in Thames-street, who a few years ago paid the usual fine to be excused from serving the office of sheriff of this city.

14.S amuel Henry Eyre, Esq; merchant, in New Broad-street, brother of the late lord chief justice Eyre.

1st Week of September, 1754, from the London Magazine

1st Week of September, 1754, from the London Magazine

September 1754

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http://www.hf.rim.or.jp/~kaji/cal/cal.cgi?1754

Letters from the Morea [Peloponnese peninsula] advise, that on the 15th of last July, about eight at night, a violent shock of an earthquake was felt along that coast, particularly near Lepanto, where some populous villages were swallowed up, and a great number of persons, as well as cattle, lost.

Some time since, seven quarry men in the island of Portland being at work on a cliff 90 yards high, to loosen a large stone with iron levers, the ground on a sudden give way, and they all fell to the bottom on a heap of rubble: Four of them were beat to pieces, but the other three, providentially, were only bruised, and are recovered.

By the accounts from Virginia, about 150 of the English were killed on the spot in the late engagement, and almost all the rest, with major Washington and several other officers taken prisoners. Our men likewise lost all their baggage, &c. The commandant of the French ventured to attack the English in their intrenchment, upon information that major Washington was to be joined in a day or two by a body of 500 men. The said major and the other officers, taken prisoners have been released on their parole, upon condition that they shall not serve for a twelvemonth in those parts against the French, and arrived at Williamsburgh some days before the Resolution, Capt. Garratt, left-York-river, which was on July 13. Divers planters of the most westerly parts of the colony, have abandoned their lands, and are removed towards the east for safety.

Sunday, Sept. 1.

A fire broke out in the housekeeper’s room, at the earl of Tilney’s, at Wanstead, occasioned by a chafing-dish of coals being left there to keep the sweet-meats dry; by this accident a great part of the household linen was burnt, the pewter melted, and much china destroyed. ‘Tis computed the damage amounted to considerably above 1000l,

Wednesday, 4.

Several aldermen, deputies, &c. of the bridge committee, met at Guildhall, who came to a resolution, that Mr. Dance, the city-surveyor, should prepare an estimate of the expence of building a new bridge; and appointed a sub-committee so receive the same.

Marriages and Births

Sept. 2. William Brockett, of the Middle-Temple, Esq; to Miss Mary Markham, of Pater-noster-row.

  1. Lord George Sackville, second son to the duke of Dorset, to Miss Diana Sambrooke, of Dover-street.
  2. Gilbert Knowler, Esq; of Hearn, in Kent, to Miss Presgrave, of Abingdon-buildings.

Deaths

Sept. 2. Rt. Hon. Alexander earl of Leven and Melvil, cue of the lords of police in Scotland, one of the senators of the college of justice, and for 13 years his majesty’s commissioner to the general-assembly there.

3. Sir Tancred Robinson, of Newby, in Yorkshire, Bart. elder brother of Sir Thomas Robinson, knight of the Bath, and one of his majesty’s principal secretaries of state. He is succeeded by his eldest son, now Sir William Robinson, Bart.

5. James St. Amen, Esq; whose father was apothecary to K. James II. has left his whole fortune, except six small legacies to his executors and servants, to Christ’s-hospital, upon condition that a fine painting of bishop Juxton his grand-father be preserved in that hospital, on failure of which it is to go to the university of Oxford, to which he has left his valuable collection of books.

Lord Maitland, only son of the earl of Lauderdale.

Rev. Mr. Dolben, minor canon of Windsor.

Lieut. Col. Thomas Rainsford, of Col. Waldegrave’s reg. of foot.

William Churchill, jun. Esq; at Redruth, in Cornwall.

4th Week of August, 1754, from the London Magazine

August 1754

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http://www.hf.rim.or.jp/~kaji/cal/cal.cgi?1754

A way to preserve the face from being pitted with the small pox.

After the eruption, and when the pustles begin to swell and be filled with the pus or matter, take chalk thoroughly pulverized, and mix it with fresh cream, so as to make a kind of liquid pomatum, that it may the more easily be laid upon the patient’s face, for which purpose a feather is to be used ; and as the pomatum dries, the anointing is to be renewed; thus the patient will not be tempted to scratch, the coolness of the cream preventing the itching, and the chalk with which it is mixed insensibly drying up the matter of the pustles, hinders it from penetrating into the flesh, and consequently from pitting: This precaution has benefitted all on whom it has been practised.

By an extract of a letter from the master of the Bear inn in Basinghall-street it appears, that Mr. Hinchcliff, who keeps the Leeds waggon, has made four journeys from Leeds, in Yorkshire, to the said Bear inn in Basinghall-street London, and back again to Leeds this summer, with a waggon whose wheels are nine inches wide, according to act of parliament ; that he performed the several stages with this waggon in the same time he .used to do with the common waggons; that the carriage is made with double shafts, drawn with eight horses; that 14 miles of the way is not turnpike-road; that he found the carriage bear a little harder than common on the horses going down hill, but not in proportion heavier than other waggons going up hill ; that he brought up five tons- Of goods at one time ; and, that it is his opinion that the broad-wheel act is the best act of parliament that was ever passed for the interest of the carrier, and the preservation of the roads. This act commences this Michaelmas.

Towards the end of Aug. was tried at Bridgewater a cause relating to malpractices at the late election for members of parliament at Minehead, wherein Henry Shiffner, Esq; candidate for that borough, was plaintiff, and Mess. Ball and Coffin, returning officers, defendants. The trial lasted eight hours and produced a verdict in favour of the plaintiff, for full damages and costs.

On Aug. 21, between one and two in the morning, there was at Gloucester (by the accounts from thence) the most violent storm of thunder, lightning and rain, that had ever been known, which put the Inhabitants under the most terrible apprehensions, tho’ no damage was done but to a house in the Bolt-lane, the main beams of which were shivered in a very surprising manner, two or three doors thrown off their hinges, and the glass forced out of all the windows.

The parliament of Ireland, which stood prorogued to Aug. 27, was further prorogued to April 12.

At the assizes at Carlisle, two men for forgery, one for stealing a mare, and five women for felony, received sentence of death. At Bristol, two men and two wo-men, for highway-robberies.

Marriages and Births

Aug. 30 Edward Coddard of Cliffe-Pypard, Esq; in the commission of the peace for Wilts., to Miss Read, of Crowood.

Arthur Weaver, Esq; of Twickenham, to Miss Papillon, of Lee, in Kent.

Charles Van, jun. Esq; of Landwern, in Monmouthshire, to Miss Kitty Morgan, daughter of Col. Morgan, member for the county of Brecon.

Mr. Williams, surgeon, to Miss Freke, only daughter of Mr. John Freke, senior surgeon of St. Bartholomew’s hospital.

Deaths

25. Mr. Draper, who for many years enjoyed several lucrative employments under the commissioners of excise.

26. His grace the duke of Bolton, lieut. gen. of his majesty’s forces, lord lieut. and custos rotulorum of Hampshire and Glamorganshire, and knight of the most noble order of the garter.

Brabison Aylmer, Esq; clerk of the peace for the county of Essex, and a bencher of the Middle Temple society.

Aug. 26. Mr. Bridgwater, of Covent-Garden Theatre

Christopher Tancred, of Yorkshire, Esq; whose death we mentioned in our last, has left his estate for the founding 4 exhibitions for the study of the law, in Lincoln’s inn ; 4 for the study of physick in

Gonvill and Caius college, Cambridge and 4 for the study of divinity in Christ-college, Cambridge ; and has ordered his mansion house at Whixley to be converted into an hospital for 12 decayed gentle-men.

Mr. William Cleghorn, professor of moral philosophy in the, university of Edinburgh.

Rev. J. Cole, M. A. archdeacon of St. Alban’s, and preacher at the Abbey church in that town.

30. Edmund Browne, of Lincoln’s Inn, Esq.

3d Week of August, 1754, from the London Magazine

3d Week of August, 1754, from the London Magazine

August 1754

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http://www.hf.rim.or.jp/~kaji/cal/cal.cgi?1754

Deaths

19. Mr. Jacob Alvarez Pereira, an eminent Jew merchant.

William lord Ross, aged 34., whose father died in June last. (

John Pringle, Esq; of Haining, in the80th year of his age, one of the senators of the college of justice in Scotland. He sat in the Scots parliament before the Union, and was a member of the British parliament from that period to the year 1729, when he was appointed a lord of session.

Mr. Curtis, father of Mr. Curtis, a fishmonger in Newgate-street, aged 102.

Christopher Tancred, of Whixley, in the county of York, Esq;

Rev. Mr. Brent, senior fellow of Pembroke college, Oxford.

2d Week of August, 1754, from the London Magazine

August 1754

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http://www.hf.rim.or.jp/~kaji/cal/cal.cgi?1754

Tuesday, 13

The jury at Edinburgh returned their verdict against Nicklas Cockburn, indicted for poisoning her husband and step-mother, finding her guilty all in one voice. In the course of the trial it appeared, that upon the 18th of March last this unhappy woman did poison her own husband, at Newton, near Dalkeith, where they then dwelt, by mixing a quantity of arsenick with his broth at dinner, of which he died betwixt 9 and 10 that night, in the greatest agony. This past at that time without any suspicion, and the husband was buried. About a fort-night thereafter Alexander Cockburn, her father, forester to the earl of Hopetoun, having died, she went there, seemingly with an intention to assist Susan Craig, her stepmother, on the occasion ; and there, on the 3d of April, while her father’s body was yet unburied, she perpetrated the fame crime upon her stepmother, by the fame means, by mixing a considerable quantity of arsenick in her pottage ; soon after the eating of which the poor woman was seized with the most violent pains, and died about 5 in the afternoon in inexpressible agony and torment.

At the assizes at Abingdon-for the county of Berks, 3 received sentence of death, one for house-breaking and the other for stealing a cow. At Winchester 3, one for murder, one for stealing a black mare, and the third for stealing several things from a woman. At Worcester, 2 for the highway, and 1for sheep-stealing. At Salisbury, 1 for house .breaking. At York, 1 for stealing goods out of a warehouse, and a woman for forgery. At Huntingdon, 2 for house-breaking. At Exeter, 1 for the highway. At Stafford, 1 for house-breaking, and another for horse stealing. At Chelmsford, a woman for murdering her own child, and aman for sheep-stealing. At Norwich, 1 for assaulting a gentleman in his dwelling-house, by presenting a pistol to his breast and demanding his money, and 2 for divers felonies. At St. Edmund’s-Bury, 1 for the high-way, and 1 for forgery. At Durham, 1 for sheep-stealing, and 1 for felony. At Shrewsbury 1 for stealing oxen. At Hereford, 1 for house breaking, and 1 for horse-Healing. At Monmouth, 1 for stealing a mare. At Maidstone, four for horse-stealing, and three for the highway. At Gloucester, 1 for stealing four heifers, and 1 for horse-stealing. At Warwick, a woman for robbing shops at Birmingham, two men for the highway, another for sheep-stealing, and one for horse stealing. At Bridgewater 7, one of which was for murder. At Newcastle, -a man (or burglary, and a woman for murdering her bastard child, for which she was executed, but denied the fact to the last. At Guildford, 10, viz. two women for private thefts, two men for housebreaking, three for the highway, one fora private theft, one for stealing a grey Gelding and one for sheep-stealing. *

At the assizes at Nottingham, before Sir Thomas Birch, was tried a cause wherein Mr. Francis Turner, an attorney-at law, at Mansfield in the County of Nottingham, was plaintiff, and Richard Turner Becher, of Southwell in the said county, register of the chapter court of Southwell, defendant; for refusing the plaintiff a sight of a will, which he had in his custody as a publick officer of the said court 5and, after a trial of several hours, the jury brought in a verdict, with damages, for the plaintiff.

An action was lately brought by the associators for preserving the game, at the suit of one of their informers, against 3 young men of Great-Baddow, near Chelmsford in Essex, to recover the penalty of 20l. for having and using nets to destroy the game ; which cause was tried by a special jury of gentlemen of the said county, at the instance of the informing plaintiff, at the last Chelmsford assizes; when, after a full and fair trial of about 7 hours, a verdict was given for the defendants: Upon which there were great rejoicings.

Marriages and Births

Deaths

  1. Sir John Wodehouse, Bart, at his seat at Lexham in Norfolk, succeeded by his only son, Armine Wodehouse, Esq; knight of the shire for that county, now Sir Armine Wodehouse, Bart.

John Samuel Longuet, Esq; nephew of Benjamin Longuet, Esq; one of the directors of the Bank.

Rt. Hon. the countess of Strathmore, in France.

1st Week of August, 1754, from the London Magazine

August 1754

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http://www.hf.rim.or.jp/~kaji/cal/cal.cgi?1754

Saturday, Aug. 3.

A person was convicted before two of his majesty’s justices of the peace in Southwark for bringing half a pint of spirituous liquor (called Geneva) into the King’s Bench prison, contrary to the form of the statute in that case made and provided. The penalty, which is 20I. was mitigated to 10l.. and upon his refusing to pay the said fine immediately (as the statute directs) he was committed to the house of correction for six weeks.

A bill of indictment was found by the grand jury for the city of York, against William Arundel, for traitorously and seditiously taking down from off the top of Micklegate-bar, the heads of William Conolly and Benjamin Mason, two of the persons executed for being engaged in the last rebellion.—He was afterwards admitted to bail.

Monday, 5.

Mary Smith, for robbing Anne Gough, an infant about three years old, and James Cobley, for stealing some valuable manuscript books out of Mr. Lintot’s chambers in the Temple, were this day executed at Tyburn. Jones and Lewis, two women, who received sentence of death together with the two former, were ordered to be transported for life, Smith’s face was covered all the way to and at the place of execution.

Tuesday, 6.

Samuel Fludyer, Esq.; citizen and cloth-worker, and alderman of Cheap ward, was chosen one of the sheriffs of London and Middlesex for the year ensuing, in the room of Allen Evans, Esq; who refused to take upon him that office.

The parliament, which stood prorogued to 8th instant, was by his majesty in council ordered to.be further prorogued to October 22.

Marriages and Births

Aug.1. Rt. Hon. the earl of Essex, to Miss Charlotte Williams, daughter of Sir Charles Hanbury Williams, knight of the Bath.

Everard Buckworth, Esq; to Miss Frances Amcotts.

John Cockaine Sole, Esq; to Miss Lushington.

Rev. Mr. Charles Merrest, eldest son of the late James Merrest, Esq., clerk assistant of the house of lords, to Miss Wilkins, of Wisbech in the Isle of Ely.

 

Aug. 2. Lady Charlotte Murray, of a daughter in Scotland.

5. Lady viscountess Mountgarret, of a son.

Dauphiness; of France, of a prince.

The lady of the Hon. Mr. How, of a son and heir.

Deaths

Aug. 5. Capt. Dansay, deputy-governor of Greenwich-hospital.

James Gibbs, Esq; well known for his great genius in architecture.

7. Dr. Pierce Dodd, many years one of the physicians of St. Bartholomew’s hospital.

5th Week of July, 1754, from the London Magazine

July 1754

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http://www.hf.rim.or.jp/~kaji/cal/cal.cgi?1754

According to advices from Naples, of July 2, they had an account from Sicily, that in June last mount Aetna made an eruption, in which it cast out such a quantity of ashes and flames, that the neighbouring country for 3 leagues round was entirely destroyed.  Several earthquakes had also happened in those parts, the shocks of which were so violent, that two villagers were swallowed up by them.

The following account was given of the cause of the disputes between the assembly of Jamaica and their governor.  It hath been the custom of that island, ever since it was taken by the admirals Penn and Venables, in Cromwell’s time, to make laws for themselves, with consent of the governor; which laws were binding and of force until they got the royal assent of the king of England; but, if the king dissented, then the laws were no longer in force; if his majesty did not dissent, they were to continue in full force and vigour till there might or should be a repeal. And the present dispute is now, whether they shall be put in execution without being first signed in England? If they are not, it will not be in the power of the governor, or the assembly, to raise men or money in that island without his majesty’s consent; which those islanders think a hardship, as they cannot, in case of an invasion or insurrection, immediately defend themselves, or prevent any commotions in that country without sending to England, and the island might be subdued or conquered before they could get their laws enacted in England.

An English vessel bound from Rotterdam for North-America, with upwards of 300 Palatine passengers on board, in her passage struck on the send called the Galloper, which beat off her rudder, and soon after she foundered. A Dutchmawho was in sight continued his course, and left the preserving of upwards of 80 souls, out of the above number, to Capt. Henderson, for the coast of Guinea, who took them on board, and landed them at Helvoetsluys, and then proceeded on hit voyage.

On Sunday, July 28, between 6 and 7 in the evening, was a most violent storm of hail and rain, attended with thunder, and lightning, at Walton in Suffolk. The hail-stones in general were as large as pigeon eggs, in various shapes, and jagged like broken pieces of ice. It did incredible damage, especially in the corn fields. Several had their glass windows broke in such manner that scarce a whole quarry remained, and the fruits in the gardens were entirely spoiled. The damage done by this storm was computed at near 500I. Where the hail fell so very thick was about a mile in length and half a mile in breadth. It seemed to have fallen down with a whirlwind, like a tornado, and nor to have spread itself far.

On Tuesday the 30th, at a court of aldermen at Guildhall, Allen Evans and John Torriano, Esqrs. lately elected sheriffs of London and Middlesex, appeared, when the latter gave bond to serve the said office, but the former pleaded his inability to serve it as being a Dissenter.

Marriages and Births

July 23. John St. Leger, Esq; in Ireland, to Miss Mary Butler, niece to lord Lanesborough, a 40,000l fortune.

30. Robert Roper, Esq; of the county of Durham, to the Hon. lady Henrietta Hay, sister to the lord visc. Dupplin.

Deaths

July 15. Lord Lewis Cordon, brother to the late duke of Gordon, in France.

25. Hon. and Rev. Henry Dawnay, D. D. uncle to lord viscount Downe, rector of Piddle-Town in Dorsetshire, &c. and one of the prebendaries of Canterbury.

16. Heny Cary Hamilton, Esq; of the kingdom of Ireland.

27. Hon. Patrick Grant, of Elches, Esq. one of the senators of the college of justice in Scotland, and one of the lords commissioners of justiciary.

19. Lady Peachy, mother of Sir John Peachy, Bart.

30. Armaindus Ernestus, baron Dirmar, field marshal of the Imperial forces, colonel of a regiment of Cuirassiers, and sometime minister of the Landgrave of Hesse-Cassel at the court of Great-Britain

Col. Driver, late of the fourth troop of horse-guards.

Rt. Hon. the earl of Westmeath, at Brussels.

4th Week of July, 1754, from the London Magazine

July 1754

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All calendar information is from this site:
http://www.hf.rim.or.jp/~kaji/cal/cal.cgi?1754

Monday, 22.

Joseph Mills, a turncock [a waterworks official responsible for turning on water at the mains], for the murder of Samuel Room, a paviour [a person who lays paving stones], in the Minories [a civil parish in London]; and Robert Finch, for the murder of his wife in Ludgate, who received sentence at the Old-Bailey immediately on their conviction, the former on Friday, and the other on Saturday, were this day executed at Tyburn.

The sessions ended at the Old-Bailey, when the other convicts received sentence of death, vix. Mary Smith, for stripping and robbing an infant about 3 years old; Thomas Collis, for sacreligiously stealing a linen surplice; Elizabeth Jones, for stealing a silver watch and 20 guineas; and James Cobley, for stealing some valuable manuscript books out of Mr. Linnot’s chambers in the Temple.

At this sessions one Lewis, a woman who had been in Newgate upwards of two years on a verdict left special for forgery, was brought into court, the same being determined by the judges, and received sentence of death.

Their royal highnesses the prince of Wales, duke of Cumberland and prince Edward went this day by water to Woolwich, attended by lord Harcourt, lord Anson, admiral Rowley, and a great number of persons of distinction; the lords of the admiralty, the commissioners of the navy, and victualing officer, also in their respective barges.  They were saluted when they went aboard by the guns at the Tower, and upon their landing at Woolwich by the guns at the warren, and all the yachts lying there.  Their royal highnesses first took a view of the several works in the dock-yard, saw the manner of forging an anchor, making sails, &c.  Afterwards they went on board the Royal Anne, a first rate man of war now building, and then on board the Dunkirk, the new 60 gun ship, which was launched that day.  A new sloop of war, called the Happy, was launched about an hour before.  As soon as the launch was over, their royal highnesses went on board the Carolina yacht, where a most elegant dinner was provided for them, and at 7 in the evening they embarked on board their barge to return to town, being saluted as before.  All the ships in the river had their colours hoisted, which, with the great number of yachts and boats of all kinds, with which the Thames was covered, formed a most beautiful prospect.

Tuesday, 23.

At a court of hustings [a platform or pavilion, a temporary structure erected at the place of an election, Wikipedia] at Guild-Hall, Allan Evans, Esq. and John Torriano, Esq.; (both merchant taylors) were chosen sheriffs of London and Middlesex, in the room of Alexander Sheafe and George Stratfield, Esqrs. Who refused to give bond to serve that office.  After the election, Mr. Torriano came forward and thanked his fellow-citizens for the honour they had done him, and acknowledged his unfitness, but promised to use his utmost endeavour to go thro’ the office with canour and impartiality.  Mr. Evans not being present, had till next court of aldermen to give his answer.

Thursday, 25.

The back front of Mr. Barrat’s late sugar-house at Paul’s wharf, which was left standing when the said sugar-house was burnt down, fell in, by which accident 5 bricklayers labourers, who were chipping bricks in the cellar, for the workmen, that were carrying up a new building, were killed on the spot.

 

Marriages and Births

23. George Colbrooke, Esq. member of parliament for Arundel in Sussex, to Miss Gaynor

23. Hon. Capt. Vaughan, son and heir to lord visc. Lisbourne, to Miss Nightingale, only daughter of Joseph Gascoigne Nightingale, late of Enfield, Esq.; a 50,000l. fortune.

20. Lady Viscountess Gallway, of a daughter

22. Lady of baron Munchausen, secretary of affairs of Hanover, of a son.

 

Deaths

22. Rt. Hon. Lady Archer